What is Truth – Rebuttal

March 27, 2007

I can’t help but considering, in the recent article ‘What is
“Truth?”‘, that there is circular reasoning involved (ironically,
since the beginning of the article is itself concerned with revealing
the circular reasoning of the initial challenge). I feel that a proper
definition of “absolute truth” would be the idea that the state of
reality and existence is absolute, regardless of anything that humans
may think or believe concerning it (see end note for how I develop
this definition). In other words, the idea of “absolute truth” is the
idea of something that is beyond, greater or more concrete than humans and human reason.

The definition of “absolute truth” given in the article, however, is:
“the measure by which we can discern what is real and what is not.”
While this definition would logically be the *purpose* of absolute
truth, it is not a proper definition because it itself defines the
concept only in terms of human perception and understanding (keywords “we” and “discern”). Thus the definition of “absolute truth” given in the article, taken alone, presupposes the idea that absolute truth is an issue of human perception and understanding, and not an issue of something beyond, greater or more concrete than it. From this erroneous definition it is easy to “prove” that there is no “absolute truth” at the writer’s leisure.

End note: The definition of “absolute truth” is of primary importance,
and so must be defined in the simplest of terms. If you search on
Wikipedia for “absolute truth,” for instance, the page that comes up
will include the sentence “Truth is considered to be universal if it
is valid in all times and places.” I would argue that the word ‘truth’
here is used as per the dictionary term (“the true or actual state of
a matter”). Thus I feel that a proper definition of “absolute truth”
would be: “The idea that the state of reality and existence is
absolute, regardless of anything that humans may think or believe
concerning it”.

-Nat


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